How would you use technology to improve medicine & healthcare?

HackMed is a medical hackathon aimed at developing creative solutions to solve problems within medicine and healthcare. It is a student-run event for individuals from various backgrounds interested in the crossroads of life sciences and technology.

Throughout the weekend, hackers at HackMed will have a unique opportunity to learn from each other, build awesome projects together, and share them with other hackers. This will allow a multi-disciplinary mesh of people working on developing solutions to pressing problems within healthcare and medicine.

View full rules

Prizes

$510 in prizes

First Prize

4 Marsboy wireless bluetooth speakers

Second Prize

4 Raspberry Pi 3

Third Prize

4 VOX+ GEAR VR Headsets

Best Use of Data awarded by Oxford Nanopore Technologies

4 £20 Amazon vouchers

Best Use of the Nexmo API

4 Sumo Parrot Jumping Drones

#HackHarassment

Use your tech skills for good and hack online harassment! Build a software solution that can help reduce the frequency and/or severity of online harassment. Members of the winning team receive Hack Harassment Battery Packs!

Amazon Web Services - Best Use of AWS

$30 Amazon Gift Card

Best Domain Name from Domain.com

Domain.com Swag Bags

Devpost Achievements

Submitting to this hackathon could earn you:

Judges

Dr. Dennis Wang

Dr. Dennis Wang
University of Sheffield

Richard Ronan

Richard Ronan
Oxford Nanopore Technologies

Gregor Engelmann

Gregor Engelmann
Major League Hacking

Sam Machin

Sam Machin
Nexmo

Judging Criteria

  • Usefulness (25%)
    Did the solution solve a real-world medical problem? How much of an impact will it have on medicine and healthcare?
  • Technical difficulty (25%)
    How hard was it to implement the solution? Was it a simple website or did the team build something that we’ve not seen before?
  • Originality (25%)
    How new the idea? Is it the next Uber for doctors or are they creating something groundbreaking new?
  • Design/User experience/Polish (25%)
    Did the team build something with the end user in mind? How polished is the hack?